Monthly Archives: January, 2017

    Corey Squire

    Instantly Actionable

    Posted by on 1/30/17 at 04:53pm

    How can a simulation report (energy model report, daylight model report, etc.) be most useful? This is a question we’ve been focusing on as we revamp and streamline the way we perform in-house simulations. The guiding principle for developing a new report format is ” instantly actionable”. Project teams should see a report and know which parts of the project are doing well and what improvements can be made. With this goal in mind, we identified a few characteristics of a new energy model report: Click to Read More

    Adam Heisserer

    2016 Energy Calendars

    Posted by on 1/20/17 at 08:37pm

    These six radial calendars show the energy-use patterns of six Lake Flato projects in 2016. The hourly data we collect from our eMonitors can be plotted into a single graphic with a Grasshopper script and reviewed to understand energy patterns and anomalies that wouldn’t be apparent through numerical data alone.   Click to Read More

    Corey Squire

    The State of Simulation

    Posted by on 1/11/17 at 10:05am

    It’s generally agreed that building performance simulation is the best method for realizing a building’s sustainability potential. In theory, a project team will run an energy or daylight simulation to study the hypothetical performance of a design and then use the simulation outcomes to make targeted improvements. This process promises to improve the efficiency, comfort, and all-around performance of a design. In the architecture community, building performance simulation is such a significant component of sustainable design that for 2030 reporting, the metric “percent of floor area modeled” is almost as important as “total energy reduction”. Despite this, building performance simulation has not yet lived up to its promise. The majority of questions that designers might have do not result in a simulation and the majority of simulations do not result in positive changes to the design. This leaves a huge amount of building performance potential on the table. The reason that simulations have failed to deliver widespread improvements is that the state of simulation today is slow and ugly. Most often, Information generated by simulations doesn’t get to the design team in time to be part of design process, and when it does the output is often graphically uninteresting or meaningless to Click to Read More Click to Read More