Monthly Archives: June, 2016

    Lewis McNeel

    I recently attended the groundbreaking for Treehouse’s new Dallas store. A year ago I knew I was in for a fun project when TreeHouse’s CEO Jason Ballard asked us to produce “the most beautiful store in the world,” and then asked us for the world’s first net zero energy big box retail building, and then gave us some new Tesla technology to help make it all happen. Treehouse Inc., also dubbed Home Depot for Hipsters, is on a serious mission to make some wonderful things happen in the world. They are a home improvement store that sells quality, sustainable building materials which support human and ecosystem health. With their home base in Austin, Texas, TreeHouse provides education on strategies for saving water, energy and costs by focusing on health and ecology. These programs help to build smarter homes and smarter homeowners that engage in environmental stewardship as part of their everyday lives. The TreeHouse Dallas store’s overarching goal of net-zero energy has shaped every step of this project. Our architectural and engineering team collaborated with TreeHouse through a fully integrated design process. We began by tracking the energy use of the existing Austin store as Click to Read More Click to Read More

    Heather Gayle Holdridge

    We are excited to announce that the Dixon Water Foundation Josey Pavilion has achieved Living Building Challenge certification, making it the first Living Building in the State of Texas and 9th Living Building in the world. The Josey Pavilion physically embodies and reinforces the Dixon Water Foundation’s mission as a fully restorative Living Building and demonstration tool. This case study reveals how the meeting and education center achieves the standards required for certification. Click to Read More

    Rebecca Bruce

    Goat Mountain Ranch, a ranch house overlooking the Nueces River, recently earned LEED certification. The project is sited on an intermediate bluff overlooking the expansive Nueces River Valley to the southwest and upward towards views of Goat Mountain and a bowl-shaped ridge encircling the site’s northern half. Click to Read More