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Adam Heisserer

Quality Views Calculator

Posted by on 3/16/17 at 10:07pm
acl render 3 small

For all of our LEED projects, we calculate the percentage of regularly occupied spaces that have exterior views. By developing this quality views tool in Grasshopper, we can now automate this calculation process and make it possible to analyze large projects that would be difficult to calculate manually. We can also get a better idea of the quality of exterior views in each space in addition to the pass/fail criteria used for LEED. Click to Read More

Sunnie Diaz

How Will Confluence Park Be Constructed?

Posted by on 3/1/17 at 04:53pm
View of Pavilion from South Plaza
View of Pavilion from South Plaza

Lake|Flato’s collaboration with the San Antonio River Foundation (SARF), Rialto Studio, Andrew Kudless of Matsys, Architectural Engineers Collaborative (AEC), CNG Engineers, and Spawglass Contractors has magically evolved the vision of Confluence Park into a pavilion that responds to and enhances the surrounding natural environment. While capturing and treating its own water, the petals of the pavilion at Confluence Park are meant to inspire its occupants and offer an interactive learning experience about the San Antonio River and its watershed. Click to Read More

Adam Heisserer
dogrun three

We’re excited to introduce three LF interns! Originally from China, Malaysia, and Guatemala, respectively, Michelle, Serena, and Alex have lived all over the world before arriving in San Antonio. Here is an exclusive Dogrun interview about their Lake Flato experience. Click to Read More

Corey Squire

The 2030 End Game

Posted by on 2/22/17 at 05:54pm
2030 future cover

With the 7th year of reporting for the 2030 commitment underway, it’s worthwhile to pause and think about how the next 13 years might play out. Reporting for the commitment started back in 2011 with a goal of achieving an across the board net-zero energy portfolio by 2030. Initially, the energy reduction target was set at 60% and every five years, the target shifts down 10% until 100% energy reduction is achieved in year 2030. Click to Read More

Corey Squire

Instantly Actionable

Posted by on 1/30/17 at 04:53pm
patterson printout

How can a simulation report (energy model report, daylight model report, etc.) be most useful? This is a question we’ve been focusing on as we revamp and streamline the way we perform in-house simulations. The guiding principle for developing a new report format is ” instantly actionable”. Project teams should see a report and know which parts of the project are doing well and what improvements can be made. With this goal in mind, we identified a few characteristics of a new energy model report: Click to Read More

Adam Heisserer

2016 Energy Calendars

Posted by on 1/20/17 at 08:37pm
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These six radial calendars show the energy-use patterns of six Lake Flato projects in 2016. The hourly data we collect from our eMonitors can be plotted into a single graphic with a Grasshopper script and reviewed to understand energy patterns and anomalies that wouldn’t be apparent through numerical data alone.   Click to Read More

Corey Squire

The State of Simulation

Posted by on 1/11/17 at 10:05am
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It’s generally agreed that building performance simulation is the best method for realizing a building’s sustainability potential. In theory, a project team will run an energy or daylight simulation to study the hypothetical performance of a design and then use the simulation outcomes to make targeted improvements. This process promises to improve the efficiency, comfort, and all-around performance of a design. In the architecture community, building performance simulation is such a significant component of sustainable design that for 2030 reporting, the metric “percent of floor area modeled” is almost as important as “total energy reduction”. Despite this, building performance simulation has not yet lived up to its promise. The majority of questions that designers might have do not result in a simulation and the majority of simulations do not result in positive changes to the design. This leaves a huge amount of building performance potential on the table. The reason that simulations have failed to deliver widespread improvements is that the state of simulation today is slow and ugly. Most often, Information generated by simulations doesn’t get to the design team in time to be part of design process, and when it does the output is often graphically uninteresting or meaningless to Click to Read More Click to Read More

mattmorris

LF Remembers Kenny Brown

Posted by on 11/30/16 at 10:50am
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It is with great sadness that we mourn the loss of Kenny Brown – a dear friend and member of our Lake|Flato family. A former LFer from the firm’s founding years, Kenny passed away this week due to injuries he sustained in a tragic motorcycle accident in September. Click to Read More

Serena Ching

Pavilion Ceiling Mock-Up

Posted by on 11/8/16 at 08:30am
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  There is only so much images and renderings could do to communicate the visual impact of details at human scale. That is why the Centennial Park Pavilion team decided to carry out a mock-up of section of a 24-foot high wood ceiling that would be experienced by visitors of the Events Pavilion. In essence, the pavilion consists of eight offset columns within an 80’ by 80’ footprint, with a roof covering a 110’ by 110’ footprint twenty-four feet above the finish floor.  A central light monitor that is 30’ by 30’ introduces more light into the middle of the space. The design was clearly a simple and minimal one, which led the client to suggest if some aspect of “pleasure, delight, and happiness” could be introduced to potential visitors of the park through tectonics, color, and texture. The decision to play up the pavilion ceiling came with the aim to create a more interesting visual texture for the flat plane. In discussion with a local acoustician, the team believes that the textured ceiling might contribute acoustically to the diffusion of sound for the many different types of events that may take place at the pavilion. Click to Read More

Corey Squire

Playing with Mud

Posted by on 10/14/16 at 03:09pm
Playing with mud

Eventually, many of us get to point where 500 degrees just won’t cut it. After years of making sub par pizzas in a conventional oven, I finally decided to build a wood fire pizza oven in my backyard. Looking at the options, a brick oven seemed too expensive and a metal oven seemed too time consuming, so I went with the material that was used to build the world’s first ovens, mud. Click to Read More